Working hard in Orlando: Day 3

Today we had a lot of good discussions around app development, starting off with an update on the state of GoLang support and what was needed to get the Go/QML bridge packaged and available for people to start using.

From there we moved on to the future of Content Hub, which is really set to reach it’s full potential now and we will hopefully see a wide range of system, core and 3rd party apps providing it with content.

After lunch Nick gave us all a quick lesson in how to properly use Autopilot, something I think we’re all going to become more familiar with in the coming months.  The key takeaway: Don’t Sleep.

Then we discussed QtCreator itself, and our various plugins for it.  We identified some easy fixes, and did a lot of brainstorming on how to attack the harder ones.  We saw the new packaging and cross-compilation support that’s being added to it now. Zoltan topped it all off by giving us a very short demonstration, going from the creation of a new project all the way, through creating a package, running package verification tests on it, copying it onto a phone and installing it, all in about 30 seconds!

We also discovered that the current SDK packages in the PPA were broken for Saucy and older releases (Trust was okay).  Daniel, Zoltan and David Barth spent much of the day intensely debugging the problem, providing a fix, shepherding those fixes though Launchpad and into the PPAs so that we could get it all working by the end of the day.  We then set aside time for a new session where we discussed what happened and what we can do to prevent it from happening again.  I’m pleased to say that some of those steps have already been implemented, and the rest will soon follow.

Finally we wrapped up the evening with chicken wings and beer, plus another fantastically entertaining card game courtesy of Alan Pope’s deranged humor.

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Working hard in Orlando: Day 2

Another day packed with meetings and discussions today.  Here’s some of the highlights:

We decided that SDK version numbering should mirror distro numbering, so instead of Ubuntu SDK 2.0 we will have Ubuntu SDK 14.04.

We worked out more details on the next App Developer Showdown, including what additions and changes to the SDK and store will be ready for the contest, and what prizes we will try to get for it.

After reviewing the current documentation on developer.ubuntu.com, we identified some areas where we need to improve it before the App Showdown.

Alan Pope and I guest starred in Jono’s weekly Q&A session, from the hotel bar, which was loads of fun.  Watch the full video to hear more about what we’ve been discussing here and maybe find answers to some of your own questions.

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Working hard in Orlando: Day 1

As I mentioned in my last post, I’m with the rest of my team in Orlando this week for a sprint. We are joined by many other groups from Canonical, and unfortunately we didn’t have enough meeting rooms for all of the breakout session, so the Community team was forced (forced I tell you) to meet on the patio by the pool.

We have had a lot of good discussions already, and we have four days left.  You’ll start to seem some of the new ideas and changes going into effect next week.  Until then, stay tuned.

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Ubuntu API Website gets an API of it’s own

Last week I posted on G+ about the a couple of new sets of QML API docs that were published.  Well that was only a part of the actual story of what’s been going on with the Ubuntu API website lately.

Over the last month I’ve been working on implementing and deploying a RESTful JSON service on top of the Ubuntu API website, and last week is when all of that work finally found it’s way into production.  That means we now have a public, open API for accessing all of the information available on the API website itself!  This opens up many interesting opportunities for integration and mashups, from integration with QtCreator in the Ubuntu SDK, to mobile reference apps to run on the Ubuntu phone, or anything else your imagination can come up with.

But what does this have to do with the new published docs?  Well the RESTful service also gives us the ability to push documentation up to the production server, which is how those docs got there.  I’ve been converting the old Django manage.py scripts that would import docs directly into the database, to instead push them to the website via the new service, and the QtMultimedia and QtFeedback API docs were the first ones to use it.

Best of all, the scripts are all automated, which means we can start integrating them with the continuous integration infrastructure that the rest of Ubuntu Engineering has been building around our projects.  So in the near future, whenever there is a new daily build of the Ubuntu SDK, it will also push the new documentation up, so we will have both the stable release documentation as well as the daily development release documentation available online.

I don’t have any docs yet on how to use the new service, but you can go to http://developer.ubuntu.com/api/service/ to see what URLs are available for the different data types.  You can also append ?<field>=<value> keyword filters to your URL to narrow the results.  For example, if you wanted all of the Elements in the Ubuntu.Components namespace, you can use http://developer.ubuntu.com/api/service/elements/?namespace__name=Ubuntu.Components to do that.

That’s it for today, the first day of my UbBloPoMo posts.  The rest of this week I will be driving to and fro for a work sprint with the rest of my team, the Ubuntu SDK team, and many others involved in building the phone and app developer pieces for Ubuntu.  So the rest of this week’s post may be much shorter.  We’ll see.

Happy Hacking.

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My UbBloPoMo plan

So it’s not February first yet, but what the heck I’ll go ahead and get started early.  I tried to do the whole NaBloPoMo thing a year or so ago, but didn’t make it more than a week.  I hope to do better this time, and with that in mind I’ve decided to put together some kind of a plan.

First things first, I’m going to cheat and only plan on having a post published ever week day of the month, since it seems that’s when most people are reading my blog (and/or Planet Ubuntu) anyway, and it means I don’t have to worry about it over the weekends.  If you really, really want to read a new post from me on Saturday……you should get a hobby.  Then blog about it, on Planet Ubuntu.

To try and keep me from forgetting to blog during the days I am committing to, I’ve scheduled a recurring 30 minute slot on my calendar.  UbBloPoMo posts should be something you can write up in 30 minutes or less, I think, so that should suffice.  I’ve also scheduled it for the end of my work day, so I can talk about things that are still fresh in my mind, to make it even easier.

Finally, because Europe is off work by the end of my day, I’m going to schedule all of my posts to publish the following morning at 9am UTC (posts written Friday will publish on Monday morning).  I’ve been doing this for a while with my previous posts, and it seems to get more views when I do. For example, this post was written yesterday, but posted while I was still sound asleep this morning.  The internet is a magical place.

So, today being Friday, I will be writing my first actual UbBloPoMo entry this evening, and it will post on Monday February 3rd.  What will it be about I wonder?  The suspense is killing me.

 

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UbBloPoMo, a solution to the Planet Ubuntu problem

Ubuntu community advocate Randall Ross has recently started off a conversation about Planet Ubuntu, the blog aggregator for Ubuntu Members.  In it he details things that he thought were broken, and offered up some ideas for how to fix them.  This was followed by response blogs from Stuart Langridge, Jono Bacon and Charles Proffit, each offering their opinions on the problems (or lack thereof) and solutions..

For my part, I think the problem isn’t so much the amount of bad content, it’s that there just isn’t enough content.  The Ubuntu community is big, diverse, and infinitely interesting.  I have no doubt that there is a greater potential among us for good, positive content than for bad content, if only we all contributed something.  So my idea is this: UbBloPoMo, or Ubuntu Blog Posting Month.

This isn’t a new idea, I’ve blatantly ripped of NaBloPoMo (National Blog Posting Month), which means we probably shouldn’t use the name UbBloPoMo, but it sounds pretty silly anyway and the double-B is a bit of a hack, so I’m okay with that.

The idea is simple, every day of the month (or as often as you remember, we won’t judge) you publish something on your blog.  It can be a huge essay, one paragraph, one line, a limerick, a haiku, or just a screenshot.  It can be about something you are doing with Ubuntu, in the cloud, on the desktop or a phone.  It can be about something completely unrelated to Ubuntu, but which represents you personally or your interests, like cooking or photography. The purpose is just to get people talking, and to let people get to know you and your interests.  It’s also a good way to get back into the habit of blogging if, like me, you’ve let yours sit idle for far too long.

So, that’s my idea.  I’m going to give it a try.  This February, in fact, since it starts in two days and is conveniently the shortest month of the year.  I’d welcome anybody else to join me in it.  Let’s load up planet.ubuntu.com with inspiring, funny, educational or just plain entertaining content that truly represents the community that we are.  If you want to participate too, announce it on your own blog and spread the word.

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Ubuntu Community Council

A funny thing happened on the way to the forums, I was elected to serve on the Ubuntu Community Council. First of all I would like to thank those who voted for me, your support is a tremendous morale booster, and I look forward to representing your interests in the council.  I’d also like to congratulate the other council members on their election or re-election, I can’t imagine a better group of people to be working with.

That’s it, short and sweet.  Thanks again and let’s all get back to building awesome things!

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Ubuntu Touch on the OPPO Find 5

Last month I announced a contest to win a new OPPO Find 5 by porting Ubuntu Touch to it.  Today I’m pleased to announce that we have a winner!

Below is a picture tour of what Ubuntu Touch running on the device, along with descriptions of what works and what doesn’t. If you’re impatient, you can find links to download the images and instructions for flashing them here. Continue reading

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Win an OPPO Find 5

Do you want a new OPPO Find 5?  Of course you do!  Well the awesome team at OPPO have given us a brand new Find 5 (x909 to be exact) for us to give you.  So here’s the deal, the first person to provide a working Ubuntu Touch image for this device gets to keep it.

Last weekend both Ubuntu and OPPO had booths at the first ever XDA Developers Conference in Miami.  While discussing both of our new products, the idea came up to hold a porting contest to get Ubuntu Touch running on the Find 5.  Jono announced the initial contest during his presentation on Saturday, with an initial challenge to have a winner claim the prize during the conference itself.  Despite having three separate developers build images and flash them onto the phone, none were able to boot into Ubuntu Touch.

So now we’re extending the contest and making it available to everybody!  To enter, you will need to send me an email containing links to the necessary files and detailed step-by-step direction for loading them on the phone.  I don’t have much experience with flashing ROMs, so treat me like a complete newbie when writing your instructions.  If your images don’t work, I will send you the output from adb logcat as well as any other information you request.  If your images do work, and meet the requirements below, I’ll be asking for a mailing address so I can send you your prize!

In order to win your phone, you need to get Ubuntu Touch running on the OPPO Find 5. Not just booting, but running, and is a way that makes it usable for other Find 5 owners.  So I’ve set out the following things that I will be checking for:

  • The phone boots into Ubuntu Touch (obviously)
  • I can launch multiple apps and switch between them
  • I can make phone calls (I have a SIM that works)
  • I can send and receive SMS
  • I can connect to Wifi, using WPA2
  • The screen goes to sleep when pressing the power button or after the set timeout period, and wakes up again when pressing the power button
  • I can play audio with the Music app
  • I can take pictures with the front and rear cameras

So, you want to take a crack at it?  Well the first step is to read the Ubuntu Touch Porting Guide.  Once you have an image you want me to try, send an email to mhall119@gmail.com with “OPPO” somewhere in the subject (just to help me out, I get a lot of email).  In that email include all of the steps necessary to download and install your image.  Again, be detailed, I’m a newb.  If you image meets the above requirements, I’ll put it in the mail to you!  After that, we can work on getting your image available for easy installation via our phablet-flash tool, so all the other OPPO Find 5 owners can try it too.

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Getting through the Trough and closer to the Edge, Together

When we announced the Ubuntu Edge crowd-funding campaign a week ago, we had one hell of a good first day.  We broke records left and right, we sold out of the first round of perks in half the time we expected, and we put the campaign well above the red line we needed to reach our goal.  Our second day was also amazing, and when we opened up a new round of perks at a heavy discount the third day we got another big boost.

But as exciting and record-breaking as that first week was, we couldn’t escape the inevitable slowdown that the Kickstarter folks call “the trough“.  Our funding didn’t stop, you guys never stopped, but it certainly slowed way down from it’s peak.  We’ve now entered a period of the crowd-funding cycle where keeping momentum going is the most important thing. How well we do that will determine whether or not we’re close enough to our goal for the typical end-of-cycle peak to push us over the edge.

And this is where we need our community more than ever, not for your money but for your ideas and your passion.  If you haven’t contributed to the campaign yet, what can we offer that would make it worthwhile for you?  If your friends haven’t contributed yet, what would it take to make them interested?  We want to know what perks to offer to help drive us through the trough and closer to the Edge.

Our Options

So here’s what we have to work with.  We need to raise about $24 million by the end of August 21st.  That’s a lot, but if we break it down by orders of magnitude we get the following combinations:

  • 1,000,000 people giving $24 each
  • 100,000 people giving $240 each
  • 10,000 people giving $2,400 each
  • 1,000 people giving $24,000 each

Now finding ways to get people to contribute $24 are easy, but a million people is a lot of people.  1,000 or even 10,000 people isn’t that many, but finding things that they’ll part with $2,400 for is challenge, even more so for $24,000.

That leaves us with one order of magnitude that I think makes sense. 100,000 people is a lot, but not unreasonable.  Previously large crowd-funding campaigns have reached 90,000 contributors, while raising only a fraction of what we’re trying for, so that many people is an attainable goal.  Plus $240, while more than an impulse purchase, still isn’t an unreasonable amount for a lot of people to part with, especially if we’re giving them something of similar real value in return.

Now it doesn’t have to be exactly $240, but think of perk ideas that would be around this level, something less than the cost of a phone, but more than the Founder levels.

Our Limits

Now, for the limitations we have.  I know everybody wants to see $600 phones again, and that would certainly be an easy way to boost the campaign.  But the manufacturing estimate we have is that $32 million will build only 40,000 phones.  That’s $800 per phone.  That’s something we can’t get away from.  Whatever we offer as perks, we have to average at least $800 per phone.  We were able to offer perks for less than that because we projected the other perk levels to help make up the difference.  So if you’re going to suggest a lower-priced phone perk, you’re going to have to offer some way to make up the difference.

You also need to consider the cost of offering the perk, as a $50 t-shirt doesn’t actually net $50 once you take out the cost of the shirt itself, so we can’t offer $240 worth of merchandise in exchange for a $240 contribution. But you could probably offer something that costs $20 to make in exchange for a $240 contribution.

Our Challenge

So there’s the challenge for you guys.  I’ve been thinking of this for over a week now, and have offered my ideas to those managing the campaign.  Often they pointed out some flaw in my reasoning or estimates, but some ideas they liked and might try to offer.  I can’t promise that your ideas will be offered, but I can promise to put them in front of the people making those decisions, and they are interested in hearing from you.

Now, rather than trying to cultivate your ideas here on my blog, because comments are a terrible place for something like that, I’ve created a Reddit thread for you.  Post your ideas there as comments, upvote the ones you think are good, downvote the ones you don’t think are possible, leave comments and suggestions to help refine the ideas.  I will let those running the campaign know about the thread, and I will also be taking the most popular (and possible) ideas and emailing them to the decision makers directly.

We have a long way to go to reach $32 million, but it’s still within our reach.  With your ideas, and your help, we will make it to the Edge.

Reddit: http://www.reddit.com/r/Ubuntu/comments/1jqyas/submit_your_ubuntu_edge_campaign_perk_ideas_here/

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